DineoMoeketsi article

BP - We all know that the media doesn’t always get all their info correct, what is the strangest thing you have read about yourself that wasn’t true? 
DM - I think I would say, The headlines stating that I have had a boob job, I’ve tried to starve myself during my weight-loss and that I have unnecessary and very false issues with people in the industry.

BP - You have a huge following on social media, especially Twitter where you have over 244 000 followers! What is the most memorable tweet you have received, or been tagged in? 
DM - There have bee so many, I would find it difficult to pinpoint one. I have had an incredible support system throughout my career and get numerous tweets and messages of a positive and loving nature. I appreciate every single one of them. They remind me to say true to myself, and show me, how I impact so many looking up to me. That keeps me present in being the best role model I can be for my fans.

BP - Everybody starts their working careers off small, what was your very first job? 
DM - In terms of working, I started in a small bath product store. In terms of my career I started with a supporting role on Soul City 10 on SABC 1.
 
BP - The entertainment industry is a tough industry to break into. What encouraging words do you have for anyone starting out? 
DM - It’s not going to be easy. You cannot expect to come into the industry and just make a hit or success story of yourself. You need to persevere. You need to put in the long hours. It truly is an industry where you start from the bottom, pay your dues and then hopefully start making a name for yourself.
  
BP - In your line of work you get to meet a wide variety of people. Who was your most memorable? 
DM - That's a tie between Nicki Minaj and Bruno Mars. Nicki was real and open. Bruno was super down to earth.
 
BP - I am sure you have encountered a few fans along the way, what has been your favourite fan encounter? 
DM - Again, I love my fans and the support they have given me in my many acting and my presenting roles. Its incredible to see what impact you can make in the lives of a fan by taking a minute to take that photo with them, sign that autograph. They appreciate it more than you know.
 
BP - Every star starts somewhere small. What was your very first role on screen? Tell us the story of how you got it, and how you responded to landing the role. 
DM - I starred in the youth drama Soul City in 2010, as Lindiwe.  I think you’re always nervous and excited when starting a new chapter in your life. So for me to have obtained my goal and having landed a break in a production, it validated all the work that I had put in and that the long hours were worth it. 
 
BP - Even the biggest stars have somebody they would love to meet, given the opportunity. Who would you like to meet? 
DM - I'd really like to meet Phyllicia Rashad, Angela Bassett, Oprah and Beyonce. Strong black females who inspire in a myriad of ways.
 
BP - Most thespians have roles they wish they had not turned down. Do you have any casting decisions you regret? 
DM - No, I think I have been extremely fortunate in a sense as to really be able to pick and choose what I agree to participate in. Any possible role that I am presented with, I scrutinize and really consider how it will impact me, how I can impact the role and what it would do for my career. That will allow me to decide whether or not to take it on. I have Television presenter under my belt, which was for a good few years. During this time I obtained valuable knowledge and life lessons, in which gave me the freedom to move  from presenting to be able to purely  focus on my acting and other facets of my career. 
 
BP - I see that you had a guest starring role in Episode 6 of the SABC1 science fiction series Room 9, in 2012. How was the experience for you? And do you think that we will ever see a successful science-fiction television series come from South Africa?
DM - I had an incredible time on Room 9. It was a deeper delving into myself as a performer. I believe there will be tons of different formats that SA will embrace in the near future as our audiences in SA are now acclimatising to local productions in a huge way.
 
BP - Now onto a more personal note for those superfans out there, Where did you grow up, and what was it like growing up where you did? 
DM - I was born and raised in a township, South-West of Springs on the East Rand called KwaThema. Growing up, I was surrounded by my great grandmother, My grandmother, My mother and many other strong woman. That created the foundation of who I am today.
 
BP - Did you always see yourself in the entertainment industry, or did you have different dreams as a child? 
DM - I’ve always been one who likes to express myself in the artistic way. From a little girl I would sing and put on productions for my family. I attended the National School of Arts in Braamfontein, then in 2009,  my dream of a life time, came true and I was given the opportunity to study at The New School for Jazz and Contemporary Music in Greenwich Village on the west side of Lower Manhattan, in New York City, New York in the United States of America (USA). This deepened my love for the arts. 
  
BP - We referred to your earliest role on TV, tell us a bit about your latest role as Kea on The Queen. How did you land the role? 
DM - Kea came about as a culmination of how strong I had become as a performer and how much The Ferguson's & I have always wanted to work together. 
 
BP - How has your life changed with the advent of fame? 
DM - You know people always have this idea, when you become a personality, fame changes you and your outlook. I don’t think it has affected me, I still know who I am and where I came from. My roots were instilled at a young age. Having my mother in the same industry, definitely assists in staying grounded. 
 
BP - What has been your most challenging role to date? What made it so challenging? 
DM - Every role is challenging. It's in your decision making as a performer to put life into that opportunity and make it memorable.
 
BP - With so much experience under your belt at such a young age, what is next for Dineo Moeketsi to conquer? 
DM - You will have to wait and see.
 
BP - Having done so much work and travel, what has become your fondest memory of your career thus far? 
DM - 2011 in Los Angeles was the best. Lived in West Hollywood. Went to a lot of parties. Did a lot of amazing concerts.
 
BP - Everyone harbours a pet peeve. What is yours? 
DM - Tardiness for sure. It’s just impolite.
  
BP - Have you enjoyed this little interview? 
DM - It’s been great, thank you.
 
BP - Final Question. If you could choose any superhero to play on a big budget Hollywood production, who would you play?
DM - There are too many real-life empowered woman superheroes to choose from, and my goal is to portray a few of them, so you will have to wait and see!